INJUNCTION ORDERS

Injunctions are legally binding Court Orders, issued by one of the divisions of the court in the UK, including the family law court. There are, in fact, many different types of injunction, but those that are most commonly associated with family law cases are those relating to the individual and the family, property injunctions that may be required or issued following a divorce or separation, and housing injunctions. Failing to meet the terms of an injunction can lead to considerable penalties, including even a custodial sentence.

Personal And Family Injunctions

Some of the most common injunctions are those that are designed to help victims of domestic violence or abuse. You do not have to be married or in a civil partnership in order to apply for an injunction.

A non-molestation order prohibits the abuse of a person by another person, and these are often applied for by abused partners (and their children) in order to help ensure that they are protected. Abuse is a broad term that includes physical violence, intimidation and harassment.

If a non-molestation order is in place, and the victim contacts the police because the order has been broken, it means that the police can remove the offender from the scene straight away. The injunction also forbids the offender from instructing or encouraging anyone else to harass or intimidate the victim.

Most non-molestation orders are provided for a specific period of time. However, there is the option to have it renewed or for you to ask for an ‘until further notice’ extension. There is no limit on the amount of times you can renew the injunction or have it extended.

Should a party break the non-molestation order, the other party can decide whether the issue is taken to a criminal court or returned to the family court. The latter can still impose a custodial sentence and comes with the possibility of a closed court.

Property Injunctions

A property injunction is most often used when couples separate or divorce. During the division of wealth and assets, the courts may decide that a property needs to be signed over to one of the separating parties. A property injunction can demand that a sale be made, that a specific person be allowed to live in that property (an occupation order), or that the deeds to the property be signed over to one of the separating parties.

A freezing order will prevent one party from selling the property whilst the divorce proceedings are still ongoing, ensuring that it remains a part of the financial settlement. This type of injunction can also cover the sale of stocks and shares, UK and offshore bank accounts, and other valuable assets like cars, art and jewellery. Freezing orders are typically used in instances where one party suspects that the other is hiding the true extent of their wealth and assets, or may act rashly out of spite or feelings of betrayal.

Housing Injunctions

A number of housing injunctions do exist, and while some aim to protect the rights of the landlord, there are injunctions that protect the rights of the tenant too. If you believe that you have been illegally evicted from a property, a successful injunction can restore your access. Should the landlord fail to allow you to return to the property, they could be fined or given a custodial sentence. In cases where the illegally evicted tenant is at risk of homelessness or violence, a court may grant a ‘without notice’ injunction. The landlord would not be asked for their viewpoint prior to the injunction being granted in these circumstances.

If you are being repeatedly harassed at your property, this could be grounds for an injunction. For example, if an individual repeatedly shows up at your front door against your wishes, particularly if they do so at night. This is a form of harassment, as are recurring unwanted phone calls and mail.

Local authorities may also apply for a housing injunction against tenants that have proven to be nuisance neighbours or problem tenants. Nuisance neighbours are not to be dismissed. They can have a hugely negative impact on both individual households and entire neighbourhoods. Negotiation is normally the first course of action and having a professional mediator present can often help the two parties reach a compromise. However, if a neighbour’s behaviour is particularly threatening or negotiations have broken down, a court injunction may be required to avoid further escalation. Such an injunction can be brought against anyone aged 10 or over who has engaged in antisocial behaviour.

Anti-social behaviour is defined in the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 as follows:

  1. conduct that has caused, or is likely to cause, harassment, alarm or distress to any person
  2. conduct capable of causing nuisance or annoyance to a person in relation to that person’s occupation of residential premises, or
  3. conduct capable of causing housing-related nuisance or annoyance to any person.

Other Injunctions

This is just a small selection of the types of injunction that can be issued by UK courts. Whether you are looking to apply for a non-molestation order, want the court to rule and issue a property injunction, or you are contesting an application for a housing injunction, you should ensure that you have suitable legal representation from a legal firm with experience in dealing with family law and injunction related matters.

INJUNCTION ORDERS

Injunctions are legally binding Court Orders, issued by one of the divisions of the court in the UK, including the family law court. There are, in fact, many different types of injunction, but those that are most commonly associated with family law cases are those relating to the individual and the family, property injunctions that may be required or issued following a divorce or separation, and housing injunctions. Failing to meet the terms of an injunction can lead to considerable penalties, including even a custodial sentence.

Personal And Family Injunctions

Some of the most common injunctions are those that are designed to help victims of domestic violence or abuse. A non-molestation order prohibits the abuse of a person by another person, and these are often applied for by abused partners in order to help ensure that the are protected. If a non-molestation order is in place, and the victim contacts the police because the order has been broken, it means that the police can remove the offender from the scene straight away.

Property Injunctions

A property injunction is most often used when couples separate or divorce. During the division of wealth and assets, the courts may decide that a property needs to be signed over to one of the separating parties. A property injunction can demand that a sale be made, that a specific person be allowed to live in that property, or that the deeds to the property be signed over to one of the separating parties.

Housing Injunctions

A number of housing injunctions do exist, and while some aim to protect the rights of the landlord, there are injunctions that protect the rights of the tenant too. Local authorities may also apply for a housing injunction against tenants that have proven to be nuisance neighbours or problem tenants.

Other Injunctions

This is just a small selection of the types of injunction that can be issued by UK courts. Whether you are looking to apply for a non-molestation order, want the court to rule and issue a property injunction, or you are contesting an application for a housing injunction, you should ensure that you have suitable legal representation from a legal firm with experience in dealing with family law and injunction related matters.

INJUNCTION ORDERS

Injunctions are legally binding Court Orders, issued by one of the divisions of the court in the UK, including the family law court. There are, in fact, many different types of injunction, but those that are most commonly associated with family law cases are those relating to the individual and the family, property injunctions that may be required or issued following a divorce or separation, and housing injunctions. Failing to meet the terms of an injunction can lead to considerable penalties, including even a custodial sentence.

Personal And Family Injunctions

Some of the most common injunctions are those that are designed to help victims of domestic violence or abuse. A non-molestation order prohibits the abuse of a person by another person, and these are often applied for by abused partners in order to help ensure that the are protected. If a non-molestation order is in place, and the victim contacts the police because the order has been broken, it means that the police can remove the offender from the scene straight away.

Property Injunctions

A property injunction is most often used when couples separate or divorce. During the division of wealth and assets, the courts may decide that a property needs to be signed over to one of the separating parties. A property injunction can demand that a sale be made, that a specific person be allowed to live in that property, or that the deeds to the property be signed over to one of the separating parties.

Housing Injunctions

A number of housing injunctions do exist, and while some aim to protect the rights of the landlord, there are injunctions that protect the rights of the tenant too. Local authorities may also apply for a housing injunction against tenants that have proven to be nuisance neighbours or problem tenants.

Other Injunctions

This is just a small selection of the types of injunction that can be issued by UK courts. Whether you are looking to apply for a non-molestation order, want the court to rule and issue a property injunction, or you are contesting an application for a housing injunction, you should ensure that you have suitable legal representation from a legal firm with experience in dealing with family law and injunction related matters.

INJUNCTION ORDERS

Injunctions are legally binding Court Orders, issued by one of the divisions of the court in the UK, including the family law court. There are, in fact, many different types of injunction, but those that are most commonly associated with family law cases are those relating to the individual and the family, property injunctions that may be required or issued following a divorce or separation, and housing injunctions. Failing to meet the terms of an injunction can lead to considerable penalties, including even a custodial sentence.

Personal And Family Injunctions

Some of the most common injunctions are those that are designed to help victims of domestic violence or abuse. A non-molestation order prohibits the abuse of a person by another person, and these are often applied for by abused partners in order to help ensure that the are protected. If a non-molestation order is in place, and the victim contacts the police because the order has been broken, it means that the police can remove the offender from the scene straight away.

Property Injunctions

A property injunction is most often used when couples separate or divorce. During the division of wealth and assets, the courts may decide that a property needs to be signed over to one of the separating parties. A property injunction can demand that a sale be made, that a specific person be allowed to live in that property, or that the deeds to the property be signed over to one of the separating parties.

Housing Injunctions

A number of housing injunctions do exist, and while some aim to protect the rights of the landlord, there are injunctions that protect the rights of the tenant too. Local authorities may also apply for a housing injunction against tenants that have proven to be nuisance neighbours or problem tenants.

Other Injunctions

This is just a small selection of the types of injunction that can be issued by UK courts. Whether you are looking to apply for a non-molestation order, want the court to rule and issue a property injunction, or you are contesting an application for a housing injunction, you should ensure that you have suitable legal representation from a legal firm with experience in dealing with family law and injunction related matters.

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